Socks from Macedonia, made in the late 19th century.
(Source.)

Socks from Macedonia, made in the late 19th century.

(Source.)

Inside the Ashkenazi synagogue in Sarajevo - the only functioning synagogue in the city.
(Souce.)

Inside the Ashkenazi synagogue in Sarajevo - the only functioning synagogue in the city.

(Souce.)


I’m Lovin’ It (Most of the Time): A Brief History of McDonald’s in Serbia
Russian courts on Wednesday ordered the closure of three McDonald’s restaurants in Moscow for the maximum 90 days allowed by law, including the first location to open in the Soviet Union back in 1990. Officials said the three American culinary outposts were being shuttered for health violations, but the mounting case against McDonald’s in Russia has been widely interpreted as retaliation for Western sanctions. Some media outlets have reported that the more than 430 McDonald’s restaurants in Russia are all due to be inspected soon. Whatever the Big Mac’s fate is in Russia, McDonald’s already has a history of stirring up major controversy in the former Yugoslavia, where the fast food chain has been both loved and loathed, a source of national pride and a detested symbol of US foreign policy. 
In March of 1988, Belgrade, Yugoslavia became the first city in the communist world to open a McDonald’s restaurant. American newspapers were still steeped in quaint Cold War clichés at the time, and ran headlines like “First Big Mac Attack Against Communism!” and “McMarxism?” Nearly half a century after two brothers named Mac n’ Dick opened the first McDonald’s restaurant in California’s Inland Empire, “Mickey D’s” received a heroes’ welcome in communist Yugoslavia. With lines wrapped around the block and police forces brought in for crowd control, the opening of the first McDonald’s in Eastern Europe was by all accounts the most successful restaurant launch in Belgrade history. More than 6,000 people were served on opening day, setting a new record for Europe.
And thus began the long and deeply conflicted relationship between McDonald’s and the people of Belgrade.

Continue reading ->

I’m Lovin’ It (Most of the Time): A Brief History of McDonald’s in Serbia

Russian courts on Wednesday ordered the closure of three McDonald’s restaurants in Moscow for the maximum 90 days allowed by law, including the first location to open in the Soviet Union back in 1990. Officials said the three American culinary outposts were being shuttered for health violations, but the mounting case against McDonald’s in Russia has been widely interpreted as retaliation for Western sanctions. Some media outlets have reported that the more than 430 McDonald’s restaurants in Russia are all due to be inspected soon. Whatever the Big Mac’s fate is in Russia, McDonald’s already has a history of stirring up major controversy in the former Yugoslavia, where the fast food chain has been both loved and loathed, a source of national pride and a detested symbol of US foreign policy. 

In March of 1988, Belgrade, Yugoslavia became the first city in the communist world to open a McDonald’s restaurant. American newspapers were still steeped in quaint Cold War clichés at the time, and ran headlines like “First Big Mac Attack Against Communism!” and “McMarxism?” Nearly half a century after two brothers named Mac n’ Dick opened the first McDonald’s restaurant in California’s Inland Empire, “Mickey D’s” received a heroes’ welcome in communist Yugoslavia. With lines wrapped around the block and police forces brought in for crowd control, the opening of the first McDonald’s in Eastern Europe was by all accounts the most successful restaurant launch in Belgrade history. More than 6,000 people were served on opening day, setting a new record for Europe.

And thus began the long and deeply conflicted relationship between McDonald’s and the people of Belgrade.

Continue reading ->

Sunrise in Croatia.

(Source.)

Sunrise in Croatia.

(Source.)

Children in Albania. Top: Durrës, bottom: Tirana. 

(Source.)

Props to whoever managed to uproot this bunker in Valbona Valley, Albania. 

Props to whoever managed to uproot this bunker in Valbona Valley, Albania. 

Rooftops in Dubrovnik, Croatia.

Rooftops in Dubrovnik, Croatia.

ancientart:

Mogilanska Mogila Funeral Offering.

This special armour (a knemis) with expressive eyes and partly striped face was part of funeral offerings found at the Mogilanska Mogila (Mogilanska mound) at Vratsa. Dated to the 4th century BC.

Currently located at the National Historical Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria. Photo courtesy & taken by vintagedept.

ancientart:

Mogilanska Mogila Funeral Offering.

This special armour (a knemis) with expressive eyes and partly striped face was part of funeral offerings found at the Mogilanska Mogila (Mogilanska mound) at Vratsa. Dated to the 4th century BC.

Currently located at the National Historical Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria. Photo courtesy & taken by vintagedept.

Map of Montenegro. Drawn in 1855 by German cartographer Adolph Stieler.

(See the entire map at the source.)

I don’t know what ethnicity to put. I don’t know what to do. I’m still thinking about it. Religion isn’t a problem, but ethnicity is. I don’t know how people in America declare themselves, right? Germans are Germans, so why can’t we be Bosnia-Herzegovinians? It is very complicated, but we should call ourselves like that. That is my opinion, and I still don’t know what to do. I would be happiest if I could call myself ‘Bosnian.’