Winter in Čepkeliai marsh, in Lithuania’s Dzūkija National Park.

Photographs by Lina Gavėnaitė.

(Source: behance.net)

I don’t know what ethnicity to put. I don’t know what to do. I’m still thinking about it. Religion isn’t a problem, but ethnicity is. I don’t know how people in America declare themselves, right? Germans are Germans, so why can’t we be Bosnia-Herzegovinians? It is very complicated, but we should call ourselves like that. That is my opinion, and I still don’t know what to do. I would be happiest if I could call myself ‘Bosnian.’

Terraced houses in Bratislava.

(Source.)

Carol Guzy, Michael Williamson and Lucian Perkins of the Washington Post won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for feature photography for their work covering the Kosovo refugee crisis.

Click on the pictures to see more info. 

 (Source.)

unhistorical:

October 2, 1944: The Warsaw Uprising ends.

The Warsaw Uprising was a military operation that took place between August and October of 1944, an ultimately failed attempt led by the Polish Home Army to liberate the city of Warsaw from Nazi forces. Implemented as part of a national uprising, the operation’s goal was to liberate the city, but it was also to do so before the Soviet Union could assert its authority there over the Polish government-in-exile in London. Polish fighting forces numbered at around 50,000, the majority of whom were fighters for the Home Army, and most were considerably out-armed: the German force, while only consisting of between 10-15,000 men, had at their disposal tanks, airplanes, artillery - and a vulnerable civilian population. Despite these disadvantages, however, Polish forces managed to take back much of the city only a few days into the fighting. While relief and ammunition did come in the form of airlifts, it was not enough. The Germans launched counterattacks, and then massacred approximately 40,000 people (both civilians and fighters) within the span of one week early on in the uprising.

Fierce urban warfare continued  for weeks; the under-armed and under-supplied Polish forces and Warsaw’s civilian population resisted German occupiers for a total of sixty-three days with little outside support except for Allied airlifts. Red Army forces, though nearby, did not offer significant military aid because most Polish resistance fighters supported the Polish government-in-exile and wished to limit the extent of Soviet influence in postwar Poland. Upon the resistance’s capitulation on October 2, 1944, the civilian population of Warsaw was cleared from the city. Between 150,000-200,000 were killed during the fighting, and a further 60,000 were shipped to concentration and extermination camps. The Nazis then methodically razed the city itself, though much of it had already been damaged during the 1939 invasion and the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. 

Macedonia Square, in central Skopje.

Macedonia Square, in central Skopje.

Originally mounted on wooden shafts, these extremely large arrowheads probably served as symbols of rank or batons of command. They are decorated with royal Bohemian monograms and badges in addition to religious invocations in medieval Czech. All three bear the monogram AR for Albert, king of Bohemia and Hungary (reigned 1437–39).

These incredible steel and copper arrowheads were made in Bohemia - part of what is now the Czech Republic - in the mid 15th century CE.

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kushkomikss:

leoquievreux:

Travail en cours / Work in progress
P56A

Viktorijas iela in Jūrmala, Latvia! Can’t wait to see more of Léo Quievreux's comics!

I can’t remember if I’ve ever posted anything from kuš or only thought about it. kuš is a Latvian comics anthology and you should check it out. They even have a tumblr!

kushkomikss:

leoquievreux:

Travail en cours / Work in progress

P56A

Viktorijas iela in Jūrmala, Latvia! Can’t wait to see more of Léo Quievreux's comics!

I can’t remember if I’ve ever posted anything from kuš or only thought about it. kuš is a Latvian comics anthology and you should check it out. They even have a tumblr!

The President Of Twitter

For a sitting head of state, Toomas Hendrik Ilves spends an awful lot of time on the internet. Most world leaders leave their online presence to aides, punctuated only by the occasional initialized platitude. The president of Estonia, however, spends hours a day reading, writing, and tweeting to his nearly 17,000 followers about issues ranging from European Union border controls to the latest Thomas Pynchon novel.

That follower count may seem modest: Barack Obama is just shy of 37 million. But what’s remarkable is that, unique among world leaders, Ilves really gets it. His account is not just a public relations tool. It’s really him there touting Estonia’s buoyant startup scene; warning of Russia’s aggressive policies toward its former satellite states in Eastern Europe; and rebuking people who put his country down. Not bad for the head of a tiny Baltic state of 1.3 million with little in the way of executive power (most of which is concentrated in the prime minister’s office).

Ančka Gošnik-Godec (1927– ) is a Slovenian children’s book illustrator. She is well-known in her country, and she was recently nominated for a Hans Christian Andersen award, but very few of her illustrations have appeared in English-language books. 

Illustrations from Za Lahko Noč by Ela Peroci (Mladinska Knjiga, 1964).

Oh, I love these. I would put a print of the one on the left on my wall if I could. 

(Source.)